Providing practical, down-to-earth advice for family historians since 1995, online since 1985.


1995-2009 Pat Richley HOME | Ask | Blog Right-click to copy RSS feed URL. Add to My Yahoo BookShelf | ContactLessons | Listen to Podcast media RSS feed
Read most 1995-2006 articles | Search | Subscribe

READERS' FEEDBACK: 11 June 2005

  • Experience with Medical Family Histories
  • Did Amish, Mennonites or Quakers Avoid Census Takers?
  • No More Certo Bottles
  • Watermelon Pickles & Pickled Peaches

--------------------------------------------------------

EXPERIENCE WITH MEDICAL FAMILY HISTORIES
From: E.Rodier cerear@telusplanet.net
DearMYRTLE,

Family Tree Maker has allowed Cause of Death to print on wall charts since the first DOS version released 1989. Windows versions since 1994 have allowed three images per person. Sometimes I plan a file to print a face picture, occupation clip art and medical or cause of death using a simple heart shape for individuals with heart problems. FTM allows multiples of 50 items so text notes can be used to explain more details like a specific type of cancer. Age at death is one of the automatic items available.

--------------------------------------------------------
DID AMISH, MENNONITES OR QUAKERS AVOID CENSUS TAKERS?
From: Elizabeth Cunningham drybones@netreach.net
DearMYRTLE, 

It certainly is not Quaker practice to avoid the census, although some may have done it. For alternative sources of information, you want to try the minutes of the Monthly Meeting they belonged to. This will include weddings, transfers into the Meeting, new members applying, transfers out, resignations from the Meeting, and releases (where the Meeting drops the member). All of the above require the approval of the Monthly Meeting in session. Quakers do not baptize, so you will not find those records. In some Meetings, a member's death was noted in the minutes, but in other Meetings it was not. You should know that in some places in the 1800s there was a split, so there may be two Meetings close together. Many records are at the collection at Swarthmore College, and more are at Haverford College.

--------------------------------------------------------
NO MORE CERTO BOTTLES
From: gypsy97@bellsouth.net
DearMYRTLE,

Your description of the canning brought back memories of my mother spending weeks in the kitchen doing it. Being the oldest in a large family, I absolutely hated it because I had to take care of the younger kids while she was busy in the steamy kitchen. But at least I spent most of my days outdoors which is where I preferred to be!

--------------------------------------------------------
NO MORE CERTO BOTTLES
From: Ncfewalt45@cs.com
DearMYRTLE,

Did so enjoy the two articles. I had 4 peach trees that grew from my compost pile where I had thrown the pits. My grand daughters 30 and 27 never did like the store apple sauce or peaches after the tasted my canned. I am now 80, started to can in 1951. My neighbor and I made grape jam one night till after midnight. Oh, the good old days. Let's have more of the articles about our youth.

--------------------------------------------------------
WATERMELON PICKLES & PICKLED PEACHES
From: Charles Royall cnroyall@wcc.net
DearMYRTLE,

Momma used "Sure Jell." We enjoyed all of her canned stuff. Folks from the 20s-30s had to do that stuff cause you could not just run down to the grocery. Fresh produce in a store was scarce and only when in season.

She even canned meat, (bacon) and rendered lard when hog killing time came in Jan. With no refrigeration it either had to be canned or cured in the smokehouse. We had a underground storm cellar because of the tornados and she kept all of her canned things in the cellar on shelves where it was dark and cool.

One thing I did not understand though, a lot of the stuff had about 1/2 inch of paraffin on top of it and then the lid.

Just one thing. I can not find anyone that can make my favorite, water melon rind preserves or good pickled peaches with one clove stuck in each peach. Oh how I would love to have some water melon rind preserves. We were never allowed to eat all of the red flesh of the melon down to the rind cause if you did then you could not have the preserves.

Momma said the can stuff in the store would kill you if it was left in the can after opening. She did not like anything in a can.

You could always find a ranch house by following the tomato cans from town to the house. The cowboys would buy several cans in town, eat them on the way to the bunkhouse and throw the can by the wayside.

I am on the down hill side of being old, not pretty old, just old.

Pretty I am not.

DearCHARLIE,
<Giggle> You look pretty fine to me, dear Charlie! I've made "watermelon pickles" just as you describe. I learned about them from my real "Gramma Myrtle." Just the thought is making my mouth water. It's very frustrating, because it takes a lot of rind to make just a few pints. I do know some ladies in Griffin, Georgia who make pickled peaches. I'll send them a copy of this column, to get the ball rolling in the recipe department.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt      :)
DearMYRTLE
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207


1995-2009 Pat Richley HOME | Ask | Blog Right-click to copy RSS feed URL. Add to My Yahoo BookShelf | ContactLessons | Listen to Podcast media RSS feed
Read most 1995-2006 articles | Search | Subscribe

Google
www DearMYRTLE.com