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We're stumped

DearREADERS,
Ol' Myrt here has received 3 queries that I simply cannot answer. I am writing to you all to see what you can do to help. I've been careful to include the email addresses of the descendants, so you can correspond directly with them for details before sending in your "official" replies. -- Thanks. Myrt :)

#1 Backwards "S" on Tombstones
#2 Unusual Clothing Fastener/Snap c. 1940-50s
#3 All Saints Court (answered!)

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#1 BACKWARDS "S" ON TOMBSTONES
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From: Angie Di Meo ang@intergate.com
DearMYRTLE,

Some of my ancestor's tombstones have the "s" in their last name backwards. What does this mean? Thanks.

NOTE FROM MYRT: It might help to know the actual names and whether the surname ends in a "double s." Additionally, it might be important to know the locality and time period of the tombstones.

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#2 UNUSUAL CLOTHING FASTENER / SNAP c. 1940-50s
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From: <Snoozing8@cox.net>
DearMYRTLE,

Your readers have been helpful in the past, so I'm keeping my fingers crossed some of them may be able to give me some information on an item that has been illusive to me for quite a few years.

During the 1940-50's decorative and colorful snap type fasteners were occasionally used instead of buttons. It had two parts and attached by a chain. The back part was usually a round metal disc with four small holes evenly spaced around the rim. The middle of the disc had an indentation (female) to receive the snap in front piece. This back piece would be sewn on the underneath shirt plaquet (the side without the button holes). The decorative front piece came in a wide variety of fanciful designs (birds, flowers, heads, animals, objects, etc.), and made of many materials (bakelite, celluloid, wood, metal, etc.). This front piece has the male part of the snap on the back of the decoration and would be SNAPPED to the back piece through the button hole. The chain attaching the two pieces would keep them attached even when they weren't snapped together.

I have searched fashion school libraries, the web, Streamline, etc. and haven't had much success learning any history about these fasteners. Hopefully some of your readers can give me some input or a lead as to where I should look. I can provide pictures if that will help. Thanks in advance. I look forward to hearing what this great group can come up with.
Fondly, Susan Porter
Board of Directors
National Button Society

NOTE FROM MYRT: This reminds me of the decorative thin chains that held front top corners of a cardigan sweater together. Instead of snaps, they had alligator clips to hold them in place on the garment. I remember using those in the 1950s and perhaps early '60s.

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#3 ALL SAINTS COURT
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From: <Rootsallie@aol.com>
DearMYRTLE,

I have an obituary of my husband's great-grandfather and at the end of the obituary it says "Member of All Saints Court C.O.F. No. 9." Does anyone know what this means? He died in Chicago in 1905, and this was in the Chicago Tribune. Anything you can tell me would be a great help.

NOTE FROM MYRT: Google provided links to a number of obituaries transcribed from newspapers throughout the country have such a reference to "All Saints Court." I am wondering if it is like a "32nd degree" in the Masons, but for the Odd Fellows?

And the ANSWER IS... <click here to find out!>

 


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