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RE: Problems with incomplete obit forms
See also:
http://www.dearmyrtle.com/06/0111.htm

From: Heath, Sheri A
DearMYRTLE,
Speaking of incomplete obits, my grandfather recently passed, and his wife of 30-odd years was my dad's "stepmother", although he was in college when they married, so she didn't have any hand in raising him, etc. She's always been insanely jealous of anything to do with my grandpa's first wife (who died of cancer), including my dad and our family. So, in the obit, there was no mention whatsoever of my dad's mom, although (unlike the funeral services) it did mention that he was survived by a son, 2 grandchildren, and 2 great-grands. To me, this is fraud, as it [a] makes my dad appear to be either considerably younger than he is (if one assumed he was a product of the marriage), [b] makes HER appear to be his mother - EEEEEWWWW!, and/or [c] would make him appear to be born out-of-wedlock. I believe this is particularly an issue because it's a very small town so one might assume people are known better and thus obits more likely to be correct.

In order to not "rock the boat" of this evil woman, he didn't say anything about it. I think he should have had a "correction" printed in the obit section of paper at the very least. How would you have handled the situation?

DearSHERI,
Geesh, how about taking a shot gun... No seriously, I've heard of two separate obits being placed in the newspaper, one by each side of the family. Its simply amazing how people carry on like this. You should see the obit for one of my immediate family members. I had to ask one of my siblings if there was a shred of reality in it as well, but I decided to let it go. The people who know can consider the source of outrageous text, others don't need to know of the family conflict.

Thinking of future generations, its a genealogist's responsibility to "get the word out" about the true relationships, with proof documents, etc. So your best bet is to compile a well-documented book, so your grandchildren and great-grandchildren will know the truth.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt      :)


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