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14 February 2006 DearMYRTLE's Family History Hour

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DearREADERS & LISTENERS,
This week's show is dedicated to
Russ Kyger ol' Myrt's original online genealogy mentor.  As usual, each weekly podcast is available for you review 24/7. Myrt's guests and topics this week include:

Click to find out more about RootsMagic 3.Bruce Buzbee, developer of RootsMagic , software to help you organize and share your family history names, dates, notes, sources and multi-media. Myrt had the pleasure of demonstrating the SHARE CD WIZARD during the St. George Jamboree this past weekend. We were particularly interested in the "Create a Shareable CD" option found under tools.

New Version 3
RootsMagic is family tree software available for Windows XP, 95, 98, ME, NT, and 2000. Ol' Myrt found it quite easy to make a custom CDs to share with her family in less than 2 minutes using RootsMagic and my database of over 10,000 ancestors. RootsMagic also provides direct integration with GenSmarts research suggestions.


 

Bob Velke, of Wholly Genes (The Master Genealogist & Family Tree SuperTools) to discuss:

Click to find out more about Black's Law Dictionary 1891/1910. Black's Law Dictionary. The 1891 & 1910 edition are both found on a CD from Bob's newer website http://www.ArchiveCDBooksUSA.com.

Donn Divine, CG, CGI explains "Editions of Black's Law Dictionary more recent than the Fourth are much less useful to genealogists than earlier ones. To make room for new material, more modern editions have dropped the very words the genealogist may need to interpret old documents--the archaic and obsolete terms that haven't been used for a century or more."

See the sample at left from the 1891 Black's Law Dictionary p298 describing:

  • Covert (and feme covert)

  • Covert Baron

  • Coverture

SEE ALSO: Myrt's review of Black's Law Dictionary.


Maggie Stewart, editor of the USGenWeb Archives Newsletter. Maggie spotlights the work of Mike Meinhart of of the county volunteers for USGenWeb. BRAVO Mike!

Boyd County, Kentucky USGenWeb http://www.rootsweb.com/~kyboyd/ This site linked to the Kentucky GenWeb Project and the United States GenWeb Project. Boyd County, Kentucky USGenWeb is maintained by Mark Meinhart and hosted by Rootsweb. The Assistant Coordinators for Boyd County are Teresa Scott-Scoggins and Judy Nunley Rengel, and the Kentucky State Coordinator is Sherri Hall. The National Coordinator is Richard Harrison.

Boyd County, Kentucky USGenWeb Archives with transcriptions and free documents is located at: http://www.rootsweb.com/%7Eusgenweb/ky/boyd/toc.html

For a little more about Mike Meinhart, Maggie sites an item posted by Sarah Lynch The Independent Posted: 01/25/06 - 11:40:31 pm EST

ASHLAND - He hasn't lived in the area since 1965, but Mark Meinhart probably knows more about the history of Boyd County than a lot of lifetime residents.  Meinhart, now residing in Columbus, Ohio, is a Web page administrator for the RootsWeb Genealogy site for Boyd County. Since he took charge two years ago, the free information site has grown from approximately 1,100 documents and items to more than 14,000.

His self-proclaimed obsession with genealogy began after his father died in a car accident in 1991. "After he was gone, I realized I didn't know anything about where my family came from," he said. Determined to trace his family tree, Meinhart said he "just went crazy" with genealogy research. "In two years, I had researched everything I wanted on my family and decided to help others with their own genealogy."


MightyMouse Tour  When it comes to online genealogical research, your computer's mouse IS mightier than the sword.


From the BookShelf features Genealogical Publishing Company's newsletter this week explains the difference between

  • Naturalization
  • Denizations

something that concerned your ancestors living in English colonies such as America.

COLONIAL NATURALIZATION RECORDS
from Genealogy Pointers 2/14/2006

During the colonial period, according to law, an Englishman was a person of English descent born on English soil. The English colonies qualified as "English soil," so an Englishman who emigrated to the colonies could transfer his citizenship to his offspring. (On the other hand, the son of an Englishman born in Holland, for example, was not a citizen and had to be naturalized in order to acquire realty and to transfer it to his heirs.)

After the Crown opened up its colonies to foreign-born immigrants in order to increase the colonial labor supply, the issue of naturalization became increasingly important. Why? Because, although naturalization did not confer political rights upon naturalized persons, it was critical for property ownership and the conferring of property rights to one's offspring. For this reason thousands of Palatine Germans, French Huguenots, Scots, and Irish as well as Dutch, Spanish, Danes, Norwegians, and other immigrants availed themselves of the opportunity to be naturalized.


There were two avenues available to foreigners who desired to become English subjects: (1) naturalization per se was conferred by act of Parliament or colonial legislature; (2) denization was conferred by the king or his agent, the colonial governor.

As a body of records, naturalization and denization records are of considerable value, but, until recently, they were very difficult to access. At a minimum these records provide the person's name and the date and colony of naturalization. In many cases they also state the person's county of residence, date of birth, country of birth, occupation, religion (mostly for Jews), or the name of a family member. Despite their value, colonial naturalization records have been under-utilized because they are widely dispersed. Thanks to a new book by genealogist Lloyd Bockstruck, this problem is rectified.

In his book, DENIZATIONS AND NATURALIZATIONS in the British Colonies in America, 1607-1775, Mr. Bockstruck has assembled every reference to a colonial naturalization or denization known to exist. The result is an alphabetically arranged list of about 13,000 naturalizations compiled from published sources and expanded and improved by the examination of source material not previously available to scholars. Researchers should also consult the index to the volume, which lists all persons mentioned in the records other than the new citizens themselves. Following is a list of colonial jurisdictions that yielded the naturalization or denization records included in the volume: England, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida (East and West), Georgia, Jamaica, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Nova Scotia, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, South Carolina, Virginia, and Quebec.

We would be remiss, finally, if we did not mention the book's excellent Introduction. In it, the author describes the twists and turns in naturalization law and policy during the colonial period. Also found in the Introduction is a comprehensive bibliography of the naturalization literature itself. These features round out a book that is destined to become synonymous with research in colonial naturalization records. (Released in 2005, DENIZATIONS AND NATURALIZATIONS is available in short supply.)
http://www.genealogical.com/item_detail.asp?afid=&ID=489

Of Related Interest:

GUIDE TO NATURALIZATION RECORDS in the United States State by state, county by county, city by city, this GUIDE identifies all repositories of naturalization records, systematically indicating the types of records held, their dates of coverage, and the location of original and microfilm records. The GUIDE also pinpoints the whereabouts of federal court records in all National Archives facilities, and it identifies every single piece of information on naturalizations that is available on microfilm through the National Archives or the Family History Library System, including the call numbers used by each institution.
http://www.genealogical.com/item_detail.asp?afid=&ID=5177
 


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Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt      :)


1995-2009 Pat Richley HOME | Ask | Blog Right-click to copy RSS feed URL. Add to My Yahoo BookShelf | ContactLessons | Listen to Podcast media RSS feed
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